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The National Trust has come under fire for encouraging children to write poems critical of the British Empire while on school trips

The National Trust has come under fire for encouraging children to write poems critical of the British Empire while on school trips.

The poems were written as part of the trust’s Colonial Countryside project, tranh đồng quê bằng gỗ đẹp which saw primary school pupils given tours of country houses. 

They were then invited to write verses about the former owners of the homes and their connections to the British Empire. 

Now, some National Trust members have slammed the project, accusing the trust of asking children to ‘denigrate their own history’.

It is the latest criticism of the charity, giá tranh đồng quê bằng đồng after it was accused of ‘lecturing’ the public and ‘demonising’ history for publishing a report into 93 historic houses’ links to slavery last September.

One of the houses that saw schools pupils shown around and asked to write poetry was Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon

One of the houses that saw schools pupils shown around and asked to write poetry was Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon

A child also wrote a poem about Lord Curzon, viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905

A child also wrote a poem about Lord Curzon, viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905

Students were shown a sword and scabbard at Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon that was looted during the relief of Lucknow from the Indian mutiny of 1857

Students were shown a sword and tranh đồng quê đục bằng gỗ scabbard at Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon that was looted during the relief of Lucknow from the Indian mutiny of 1857

One of the houses that saw schools pupils shown around and asked to write poetry was Charlecote Park, near Stratford-upon-Avon.

There, they were shown a sword and scabbard looted during the relief of Lucknow from the Indian mutiny of 1857.

According to the Times, one student wrote: ‘Stolen by the English; a freedom sword, a stolen freedom sword.’ 

In another case, a child wrote a poem about Lord Curzon, viceroy of India from 1899 to 1905.

It read: ‘He thinks he’s strong, trying to take over India.’ 

The National Trust, which owns Lord Curzon’s former home, Kedleston Hall in Derbyshire, has removed the poem from its website.  

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS news" data-version="2" id="mol-93eea8a0-96c4-11eb-af67-1b5e784007b7" website Trust asks children to write poems lamenting British Empire

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